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Tantric Scriptures - The Mahanirvana Tantra -3

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Tantric Scriptures - The Mahanirvana Tantra

By Sir John Woodroffe (Arthur Avalon)
The mahanirvana Tantra is in the form of dialog between Lord Siva and his consort Parvati where the Mahadeva Himself explains the theory and practice of Tantra and various mantras to Her. It is one of the most important Tantrik texts. This text includes a detailed introduction by Sir John Woodroffe





Chapter 6 – Placing of the Shri-patra, Homa, Formation of the Chakra, and other Rites
SHRI DEVI said:
As Thou hast kindness for Me, pray tell Me, O Lord! more particularly about the Pancha-tattvas and the other observances of which Thou hast spoken (1).
Shri Sadashiva said:
There are three kinds of wine which are excellent – namely, that which is made from molasses, rice, or the Madhuka flower. There are also various other kinds made from the juice of the palmyra and date tree, and known by various names according to their substance and place of production. They are all declared to be equally appropriate in the worship of the Devata (2).
Howsoever it may have been produced, and by whomsoever it is brought, the wine, when purified, gives to the worshipper all siddhi. There are no distinctions of caste in the taking of wine so sanctified (3). Meat, again, is of three kinds, that of animals of the waters, of the earth, and of the sky. From wheresoever it may be brought, and by whomsoever it may have been killed, it gives, without doubt, pleasure to the Devas (4). Let the desire of the disciple determine what should be offered to the Devas. Whatsoever he himself likes, the offering of that conduces to his well-being (5). Only male animals should be decapitated in sacrifice. It is the command of Shambhu that female animals should not be slain (6). There are three superior kinds of Fish – namely, Shala, Pathina and Rohita. Those which are without bones are of middle quality, whilst those which are full of bones are of inferior quality. The latter may, however, if well fried, be offered to the Devi (7-8).
There are also three kinds of parched food, superior, middle, and inferior. The excellent and pleasing kind is that made from Shali rice, white as a moonbeam, or from barley or wheat, and which has been fried in clarified butter. The middling variety is made of fried paddy. Other kinds of fried grain are inferior (9-10). Meat, fish, and parched food, fruits and roots, or anything else offered to the Devata along with wine, are called Shuddhi (11). O Devi! the offering of wine without Shuddhi, as also puja and tarpana (without Shuddhi), become fruitless, and the Devata is not propitiated (12). The drinking of wine without Shuddhi is like the swallowing of poison. The disciple is ever ailing, and lives for a short time and dies (13). O Great Devi! when the weakness of the Kali Age becomes great, one’s own Shakti or wife should alone be known as the fifth Tattva. This is devoid of all defects (14). O Beloved of My Life! in this (the last Tattva) I have spoken of Svayambhu and other kinds of flower. As substitutes for them, however, I enjoin red sandal paste (15). Neither the Tattvas nor flowers, leaves, and fruits should be offered to the Mahadevi unless purified. The man who offers them without purification goes to hell (16).
The Shri-patra should be placed in the company of one’s own virtuous Shakti; she should be sprinkled with the purified wine or water from the common offering (17). The Mantra for the sprinkling of the Shakti is –
Mantra
Aing, Kling, Sauh. Salutation to Tripura; purify this Shakti, make her my Shakti; Svaha (18-19).
If she who is to be Shakti is not already initiated, then the Maya Vija should be whispered into her ear, and other Shaktis who are present should be worshipped and not enjoyed (20).
The worshipper should then, in the space between himself and the Yantra, draw a triangle with the Maya Vija in its centre, and outside the triangle and in the order here stated a circle, a hexagon, and a square (21). The excellent disciple should then worship in the four corners of the square the Pithas, Purna-shaila, Uddiyana, Jalandhara, and Kama-rupa, with the Mantras formed of their respective names, preceded by Vijas formed by the first letter of their respective names, and followed by Namah (22).
Then the six parts of the body should be worshipped in the six corners of the hexagon. Then worship the triangle, with the Mula-Mantra, and then the Shakti of the receptacle with the Maya Vija and Namah (23). Wash the receptacle with the Mantra Namah, and then place it (as in the case of the jar) on the Mandala, and worship in it the ten parts of Vahni with the first letters of their respective names as Vijas (24). These parts, which are ten in number – viz., Dhumra, Archih, Jvalini, Sukshma, Jvalini, Vishphulingini, Sushri, Surupa, Kapila,Havya-kavya-vaha – should be uttered in the Dative singular, and followed by the Mantra Namah (25-26).
Then worship the region of Vahni (in the adhara or receptacle) with the following:
Mantra
Mang: Salutation to the region of Vahni with his ten qualities (27).
Then, taking the vessel of offering and purifying it with the Mantra Phat, place it on the receptacle, and, having so placed it, worship therein the twelve parts of the Sun with the Vijas, commencing with Ka-Bha to Tha-Da (28). These twelve parts are – Tapini, Tapini, Dhumra, Marichi, Jvalini, Ruchi, Sudhumra, Bhoga-da, Vishva, Bodhini, Dharini, Kshama (29). After this, worship the region of Sun in the vessel of offering with the following:
Mantra
Ang: Salutation to the circle of Sun, with His twelve parts (30).
Then the worshipper should fill the cup of offering three-quarters full with wine taken from the jar, uttering the Matrika Vijas in the reverse order (31). Filling the rest of the cup with water taken from the special offering, let him worship with a well-controlled mind the sixteen digits of the Moon, saying as Vijas each of the sixteen vowels before each of the sixteen digits spoken in the dative singular, followed by the Mantra Namah (32).
The sixteen desire-granting digits of Moon are – Amrita, Pranada, Pusha, Tushti, Pushti, Rati, Dhriti, Shashini, Chandrika, Kanti, Jyotsna, Skri, Priti, Angada, Purna, and Purnamrita (33). As in the case of the other Devas mentioned, the disciple should then worship the region of the Moon with the following:
Mantra
Ung: Salutation to the region of Moon with its sixteen digits (34).
Durva grass, sun-dried rice, red flowers, Varvara, leaf, and the Aparajita flower should be thrown into the vessel with the Mantra Hring, and the sacred waters should be invoked into it (35). Then, covering the wine and the vessel of offering with the Avagunthana Mudra, and uttering the Armour Vija, protect it with the Weapon-Vija, and converting it into ambrosia with the Dhenu-Mudra, cover it with the Matsya-Mudra (36). Making japa of the Mula-Mantra ten times, the Ishta-devata should be invoked and worshipped with flowers offered in the joined palms.
Then charge the wine with the following five Mantras, beginning with akhanda: (37)
Mantras
O Kula-rupini! infuse into the essence of this excellent wine which produces full and unbroken bliss its thrill of joy (38).
Thou who art like the nectar which is in Ananga, and art the embodiment of Pure Knowledge, place into this liquid the ambrosia of Brahmananda (39).
O Thou, who art the very image of That! do Thou unite this arghya with the image or self of That, and having become the kulamrita, blossom in me (40).
Bring into this sacred vessel, which is full of wine, essence of ambrosia produced from the essence of all that is in this world, and containing all kinds of taste (41).
May this cup of self, which is filled with the nectar of self, Lord, be sacrificed in the Fire of the Supreme Self (42).
Having thus consecrated the wine with the Mantra, think of the union in it of Sadashiva and Bhagavati and wave lights and burning incense-sticks before it (43).
This is the consecration of the Shri-patra in Kaulika worship. Without such purification the disciple is guilty of sin, and the worship is fruitless (44). The wise one should then, according to the rules prescribed for the placing of the common offering, place between the jar and the Shri-patra the cups of the Guru, the cup of Enjoyment, the cup of the Shakti, the cups of the Yoginis of the Vira and of Sacrifice, and those for the washing of the feet and the rinsing of the mouth respectively, making nine cups in all (45-46).
Then, filling the cups three-quarters full of wine from the jar, a morsel of Shuddhi of the size of a pea should be placed in each of them (47). Then, holding the cup between the thumb and the fourth finger of the left hand, taking the morsel of Shuddhi in the right hand, making the Tattva-mudra, Tarpana should be done. This is the practice which has been enjoined (48). Taking an excellent drop of wine from the Shripatra and a piece of Shuddhi, Tarpana should be made to the Deva Ananda-Bhairava and the Devi Ananda-Bhairavi (49).
Then, with the wine in the cup of the Guru, offer oblations to the line of Gurus. in the first place to the worshipper’s own Guru seated together with his wife on the lotus of a thousand petals, and then to the Parama Guru, the Parapara Guru, the Parameshti Guru successively. In offering oblations to the four Gurus, the Vagbhava Vija should first be pronounced, followed in each case by the names of each of the four Gurus (50). Then, with wine from the cup of enjoyment, the worshipper should, in the lotus of his heart, offer oblations to the Adya-Kali. In this oblation Her own Vija should precede, and Svaha should follow Her name. This should be done thrice (51).
Next, with wine taken from the cup of the Shakti, oblation should be similarly offered to the Devata of the parts of Her body and their Avarana-Devatas (52). Then, with the wine in the cup of the Yogini, oblation should be offered to the Adya-Kalika, carrying all Her weapons and with all Her followers.
Then should follow the sacrifice to the Vatukas (53). The wise worshipper should draw on his left an ordinary rectangular figure, and after worshipping it, place therein food with wine, meat, and other things (54). With the Vijas of Vak, Maya, Kamala, and with the Mantra:
“Vang, Salutation to Vatuka,” he should be worshipped in the East of the rectangle, and then sacrifice should be offered to him (55).
Then, with the Mantra
“Yang to the Yogin is Svaha,”
sacrifice should be made to the Yoginis on the South (56), and then to Kshetra-pala on the West of the rectangle, with the Mantra
“To Kshetra-pala namah,”
preceded by the letter Ksha, to which in succession the six long vowels are added with the Vindu (57). Following this, sacrifice should be made to Gana-pati on the North, adding to Ga the six long vowels in succession with the Vindu thereon, followed by the name of Ganesha in the dative singular, and ending with Svaha. Lastly, sacrifice should be made inside the rectangle to all Bhutas, according to proper form (58-59).
Uttering “Hring, Shring, Sarvva-vighna-kridbhyah,” add “Sarvva-bhutebhyah,” and then “Hung Phat Svaha;” this is how the Mantra is formed (60). Then a sacrifice to Shiva should be made with the following:
Mantra
Ong, O Dev! O Shiva, O Exalted One, Thou art the image of the final conflagration at the dissolution of things, deign to accept this sacrifice, and to reveal clearly to me the good and evil which is my destiny. To Shiva I bow.
This is the Mula-Mantra in the worship of Shiva.
Having said this, perform the sacrifice, saying, “This is Thy Vali. To Shiva, Namah. O Holy One! I have now described to Thee the mode of formation of the circle of worship (and the placing of the cup and other rites) (61-62). Then, making with the two hands the Kachchhapa-Mudra, let the worshipper take up with his hands a beautiful fiower scented with sandal, fragrant aloes, and musk, and, carrying it to the lotus of his heart, let him meditate therein (in the lotus) upon the most supreme Adya (63-64).
Then let him lead the Devi along the Sushumna Nadi, which is the highway of Brahman to the great Lotus of a thousand petals, and there make Her joyful. Then, bringing Her through his nostrils, let him place Her on the flower (her presence being communicated) as it were, by one light to another, and place the flower on the Yantra and with folded hands pray with all devotion to his Ishta-devata thus (65-66):
Mantra
O Queen of the Devas! Thou who art easily attained by devotion. Remain here, I pray Thee, with all Thy following, the while I worship Thee (67).
Then, uttering the Vija Kring, say the following:
Mantra
O Adya Devi Kalika! come here with all Thy following, come here (and then say), stay here, stay here (68); (and then say) place Thyself here, (and then say) be Thou detained here. Accept my worship (69).
Having thus invoked (the Devi) into the Yantra, the Vital Airs of the Devi should be infused therein by the following pratishtha Mantra (70):
Mantra
Ang, Hring, Krong, Shring, Svaha; may the five Vital Airs of this Devata be here: Ang, Hring, Krong, Shring, Svaha (71). Her Jiva is here placed – Ang, Hring, Krong, Shring, Svaha – all senses – Ang, Hring, Krong, Shring, Svaha. Speech, mind, sight, smell, hearing, touch, and the Vital Airs of the Adya-Kali Devata, may they come here and stay happily here for ever. Svaha (72-74).
Having recited the above three times, and having in due form placed the Vital Airs (of the Devi) in the Yantra with the Lelihina-Mudra, with folded palms, he (the worshipper) should say (75):
Mantra
O Adya Kali! hast Thou had a good journey, hast Thou had a good journey? O Parameshvari! mayest Thou be seated on this seat (76)?
Then, whilst repeating the primary Mantra, sprinkle thrice the water of the special oblation over the Devi, and then make Nyasa of the Devi with the six parts of Her body. This ceremony is called Sakalikarama or Sakalikriti. Then worship the Devi with all the sixteen offerings (77). These are: water for washing the feet, the water for the offering, water for rinsing the mouth and for Her bath, garments, jewels, perfume, flowers, incense-sticks, lights, food, water for washing the mouth, nectar, pan, water of oblation, and obeisance. In worship these sixteen offerings are needed (78-79).
Uttering the Adya Vija, and then saying “this water is for washing the feet of the (Adya). To the Devata Namah,” offer the water at the feet of the Devi. Similarly with the word Svaha, in place of Namah, the offering should be placed at the head of the Devi (80). Then the wise worshipper with Svadha should offer the water for rinsing the mouth to the mouth of the Devi, and then the worshipper should offer to the lotus-mouth of the Devi Madhu-parka with the Mantra Svadha. He should then offer water to rinse the mouth (a second time) with the Mantra “Vang Svadha” (81). Then the worshipper, saying:
Mantra
Hring, Shring, Kring, Parameshvari, Svaha: I offer this water for bathing, this apparel, these jewels, to the Supreme Devi, the Primordial Kalika. Svaha,
make an offer of them to all parts of the body of the Devi (82).
Then the worshipper should, with the same Mantra, but ending with Namah, offer scent with his middle and third finger to the heart-lotus (of the Devi), and with the same Mantra, but ending with Vaushat, he should similarly offer to Her flowers (83). Having placed the burning incense and lighted lamp in front of Devi, and sprinkling them with water, they should be given away with the
Mantra
Hring, Shring, Kring, Parameshvari, Svaha: This incense-stick and light I humbly offer to Adya-Kalika. Svaha.
After worship of the Bell with the
Mantra
O Mother, Who produces the sound which proclaims triumph to Thee. Svaha,
he should ring it with his left hand, and, taking up the incense-stick with his right hand, he should wave it up to the nostrils of the Devi. Then, placing the incense-stick on Her left, he should raise and wave the light ten times up to and before the eyes of the Devi (84-86). Then, taking the Cup and the Shuddhi in his two hands, the worshipper should, whilst uttering the Mula-Mantra, offer them to the centre of the Yantra (87).
Mantra
O Thou who hast brought to an end a crore of kalpas, take this excellent wine, as also the Shuddhi, and grant to me endless liberation (88).
Then, drawing a figure (in front of the Yantra), according to the rules of ordinary worship, place the plate with food thereon (89). Sprinkle the food (with the Mantra Phat) and veil it with the Avagunthana-Mudra (and the Mantra Hung), and then again protect it (by the Mantra Phat) (Saying Vang), and, exhibiting the Dhenu-Mudra over it, make it into the food of immortality. Then, after recitation of the Mula-Mantra seven times, it should be oftered to the Devi with the water taken from the vessel of offering (90).
The worshipper, after reciting the Mula-Mantra, should say: “This cooked food, with all other necessaries, I offer to the Adya-Kali, my Ishta-devi.” He should then say: “O Shiva! partake of this offering” (91). Then he should make the Devi eat the offering by means of the five Mudras called Prana, Apana, Samana, Vyana, and Udana (90).

Next, form with the left hand the Naivedya-Mudra, which is like a full-blown lotus. Then, whilst reciting the Mula-Mantra, give away the jar with wine to the Devi for Her to drink. After that offer again water for rinsing the mouth, and following that a threefold oblation should be made to the Devi with wine from the cup of the Shri-patra (93-94). Then, reciting the Mula-Mantra, let the worshipper offer five handfuls of flowers to the head, heart, Muladhara Lotus, the feet, and all parts of the body of the Devi (95), and thereafter with folded palms he should pray to his Ishta-devata thus:
Mantra
O Ishta-devata! I am now worshipping the Devatas who surround thee, namah (96).
The six parts of the body of the Devi should then be worshipped at the four corners of the Yantra, and in front and behind it in their order; and then the line of Gurus should be worshipped (97). Then, with scent and flowers, worship the four Kula-gurus – namely, Guru, Parama-guru, Parapara-guru, Parameshti-guru (98).
Then, with the wine in the cup of the Guru, make three Tarpanas to each, and on the lotus of eight petals worship the eight Mother Nayikas – namely, Mangala, Vijaya, Bhadra, Jayanti, Aparajita, Nandini, Narasinghi, and Kaumari (99-100), and on the tips of the petals worship the eight Bhairavas – Asitanga, Ruru, Chanda, Krodhonmatta, Bhayangkara, Kapali, Bhishana, and Sanghara (101-102). Indra and the other Dik-palas should be worshipped in the Bhu-pura, and their weapons outside the Bhu-pura, and then Tarpana should be made to them (103).
After worshipping (the Devi) with all the offerings, sacrifice should be carefully made to Her (104). The ten approved beasts which may be sacrificed are – deer, goat, sheep, buffalo, hog, porcupine, hare, iguana, and rhinoceros (105); but other beasts may also be sacrificed if the worshipper so desires (106). The worshipper versed in the rules of sacrifice should select a beast with good signs, and, placing it before the Devi, should sprinkle it with the water from the Vishesharghya, and by the Dhenu-Mudra should make it into nectar.
Let him then worship the goat (sheep, or whatever other animal is being sacrificed) with (the Mantra) “Namah to the goat,” which is a beast, and with perfumes, flowers, vermilion, food, and water. Then he should whisper into the ears of the beast the Gayatri Mantra, which severs the bond of its life as a beast (107-108). The Pashu-Gayatri, which liberates a beast from its life of a beast, is as follows: After the word “Pashu-pashaya” say ” Vidmahe,” then, after the word “Vishva-karmane,” say “Dhimahi,” and then “Tanno jivah prachodayat.”
Mantra
Let us bring to mind the bonds of the life of a beast. Let us meditate upon the Creator of the Universe. May He liberate us from out of this life (of a beast) (109-110).
Then, taking the sacrificial knife, the excellent worshipper should worship it with the Vija “Hung,” and worship Sarasvati and Brahma at its end, Lakshmi and Narayana at its middle, and Uma and Maheshvara at the handle (111-112). Then the sacrificial knife should be worshipped with the
Mantra
Namah to the sacrificial knife infused with the presence of Brahma, Vishnu, Shiva, and their Shaktis (113).
Then, dedicating it with the Great Word, he should, with folded hands, say: “May this dedication to Thee be according to the ordained rites” (114).
Having thus offered the beast to the Devi, it should be placed on the ground (115). The worshipper then, with mind intent upon the Devi, should sever the head of the beast with one sharp stroke. This may be done either by the worshipper himself or by his brother, brother’s son, a friend, or a kinsman, but never by one who is an enemy (116). The blood, when yet warm, should be offered to the Vatukas. Then the head with a light on it should be offered to the Devi with the following:
Mantra
“This head with the light upon it I offer to the Devi with obeisance ” (117).
This is the sacrificial rite of the Kaulikas in Kaula worship. If it be not observed, the Devata is never pleased (118). After this Homa should be performed. Listen, O Beloved One! to the rules which relate to it (119). The worshipper should, with sand, make on his right a square, each side of which is one cubit. Let him, then, while reciting the Mula-Mantra, gaze at it, stroke it with a wisp of kusha grass, uttering the Weapon-Vija, and then sprinkle it with water to the accompaniment of the same Vija (120).
Then, veiling it with the Kurchcha-Vija, he should say: “Obeisance to the sthandila of the Devi,” and with this Mantra worship the square (121). Then, inside the square three lines should be drawn from East to West, and three lines from South to North, of the length of a pradesha. When this has been done, the (following Devatas, whose names are hereinafter given) should be worshipped over these lines (122). Over the lines from West to East worship Mukunda, Isha, and Purandara: over the lines from South to North, Brahma, Vaivasvata, and Indu (123).
Then a triangle should be drawn within the square, and within the triangle the Vija Hsauh should be written. Outside the triangle draw a hexagon, outside this a cirde, and outside the circle a lotus with eight petals, and outside this a (square) Bhu-pura, with four entrances; so should the wise one draw the excellent Yantra (124). Having worshipped with the Mula-Mantra and with offerings of handfuls of flowers, the space thus marked off and washed, the articles for the Homa sacrifice with the Pranava, the intelligent one, should, after first uttering the Maya Vija, worship in the pericarp of the lotus the Adhara-shakti and others, either individually or collectively (125). Piety, Knowledge, Dispassion, and Dominion should be worshipped in the Agni, Ishana, Vayu, and Nairrita corners of the Yantra respectively, and the negation of the qualities in the East, North, West, and South respectively, and in the centre Ananta and Padma (126-127). Then let him worship Sun with his twelve parts, and Moon with her sixteen digits, and, on the filament commencing from the East, worship Pita, and then Shveta, Aruna, Krishna, Dhumra, Tibra, Sphulingini, Ruchira, in their order, and in the centre Jvalini (128-129). In all worship Pranava should commence the Mantra, and Namah should end it. The seat of Fire should be worshipped with the
Mantra
Rang, Salutation to the seat of Fire.
Then the Mantrin should meditate upon the Devi Sarasvati after She has bathed, with eyes like the blue lotus on the seat of Fire in the embrace of Vagishvara, and worship in the seat of Fire with the Maya-Vija (130).
Then let him bring Fire in the manner prescribed, and gaze intently on it, and, whilst repeating the Mula-Mantra, invoke Vahni into it with the Mantra Phat (131-132). Then the seat of Fire should be worshipped in the Yantra with the
Mantra
Ong Salutation to the Yoga-pitha of Fire,
and on the four sides, beginning on the East and ending on the South, Vama, Jyeshtha, Raudri, Ambika, should be worshipped in the order given (133).
Then the marked-off space should be worshipped with the
Mantra
Salutation to the sthandila of the revered Devata, the Primeval Kalika:
and then within this place the worshipper should meditate upon the Devi Vagishvari under the form of the Mula-Devata. After lighting the Fire with the Vija Rang, and reciting the Mula-Mantra, and then the
Mantra
Hung Phat: to the eaters of raw flesh: Svaha,
the share of the raw meat eaters (Rakshasas) should be put aside. Gaze at the Fire, saying the Weapon-Mantra, and surround it with the Veil Mudra, uttering the Vija Hung (134-136). Make the Fire into nectar with the Dhenu-Mudra. Take some Fire in both palms, and wave it thrice in a circle over the sthandila from right to left. Then with both knees on the ground, and meditating on Fire as the male seed of Shiva, the worshipper should place it into that portion of the Yoni Yantra which is nearest him (137-138). Then, first, worship the Image of Fire with the
Mantra
Hring, Salutation to the Image of Fire,
and after that the Spirit of Fire with the
Mantra
Rang: to the Spirit of Fire namah (139).
The Mantrin will then think in his mind of the awakened form of Vahni, and kindle the fire with the following (140)
Mantra
Ong, yellow Spirit of Fire, which knows all, destroy, destroy, burn, burn, ripen, ripen command: Svaha.
This is the Mantra for kindling Fire. After this, with folded hands, Fire should again be adored (141-142).
Mantra
I adore the kindled Fire of the colour of gold, free from impurity, burning, author of the Veda the devourer of oblations, which faces every quarter (143).
After adoration of Fire in this manner, cover the marked-off space with kusha grass, and then the worshipper, giving Fire the name of his own, Ishta-devata, should worship him (144).
Mantra
Ong,O Red-eyed One! Vaishvanara, origin of the Veda, come here, come, come here, (help me to) accomplish all (my) works: Svaha.
Then the seven Tongues of Fire, Hiranya and others, should be worshipped (145-146). The worshipper should next adore the six Limbs of Vahni uttering the word “of a thousand rays” in the dative singular, and at the end “obeisance to the heart” (147).
Then the wise one should worship the forms of Vahni (147), the eight forms Jata-veda and others (148), and then the eight Shaktis – namely, Brahmi and others, the eight Nidhis – namely, Padma and others, and the ten Dik-palas – namely, Indra and others (149).
After worshipping the thunderbolt and other weapons, the sacrificer should take two blades of kusha grass of the length of the space between his stretched-out thumb and forefinger, and place them lengthwise in the ghee (150). He should meditate on the Nadi Ida in the left part of the ghee, and on the Nadi Pingala in the right portion, and on the Nadi Sushumna in the centre, and with a well-controlled mind take ghee from the right side, and offer it to the right eye of Vahni with the following:
Mantra
Ong to Agni Svaha.
Then, taking ghee from the left side, offer it to the left eye of Vahni with the
Mantra
Ong to Soma Svaha (151-153).
Then, taking ghee from the middle portion, offer it to the forehead of Vahni with the
Mantra
Ong to Agni and Soma Svaha (154).
Then, saying namah, take the ghee again from the right side, say first the Pranava, and then
Mantra
To Agni the Svishti-krit Svaha.
With this Mantra he should offer oblation to the mouth of Vahni. Then, uttering the Vyahriti with the Pranava at the commencement, and Svaha at the end, the Homa sacrifice should be performed (155-156). Then he should offer oblations thrice with the
Mantra
Om,O Vaishvanara, origin of the Veda, come hither, come hither, O Red-eyed One! and fulfil all my works (157)
Then, invoking the Ishta-Devata with the proper Mantra into the Fire, let him worship Her and the Pitha-Devata. Twenty-five oblations should then be offered (uttering the Mula-Mantra with Svaha at the end), and, contemplating on the union (or identity) of his own soul with Vahni and the Devi, eleven oblations should also be offered with the Mula-Mantra to the Anga-Devatas, concluding with Svaha (158-159).
Then, with a mixture of ghee, tila-seed, honey, or with flowers and bael-leaves, or with (other prescribed) articles, oblation should be made for the attainment of one’s desire. This oblation should be made not less than eight times, and with every attention and care (160-161). Then, reciting the primary Mantra ending with Svaha, complete oblation should be made (with a full ladle) with fruits and leaves. The worshipper, with the Sanghara-Mudra, transferring the Devi from the Fire to the lotus of his heart (162), should then say “Pardon me,” and dismiss Him who feeds on oblations. Then, distributing presents, the Mantrin should consider that the Homa has been duly performed (163).
Then the excellent worshipper should place between the eyebrows what is left over of the oblations (164). This is the ordinance relating to Homa in all forms of Agama worship. After performance of Homa the worshipper should proceed to do japa (165). Now, listen,O Devi! to the instructions which relate to japa by which the Vidya is pleased. During japa, the Devata, the Guru, and the Mantra should be considered as one (166). The letters of the Mantra are the Devata, and the Devata is in the form of the Guru. To him who worships them as one and the same, his is the greatest success (167).
The worshipper should then meditate upon his Guru as being in his head, the Devi in his heart, the Mula-Mantra in the form of tejas on his tongue, and himself as united with the glory of all three (168). Then, adding the Tara to the beginning and the end of the Mula-Mantra, it should be made japa of seven times, and then it should be recapitulated with the Matrika Vija at its beginning and end (169). The wise worshipper should make japa of the Maya-Vija over his head ten times, and of the Pranava ten times over his mouth, and of the Maya-Vija again seven times in the lotus of his heart, and then perform Pranayama (170).
Then, taking a rosary of coral, etc, let him worship it thus:
Mantra
O rosary,O rosary,O great rosary, thou art the image of all Shaktis. Thou art the repository of the fourfold blessings. Do thou therefore be the giver to me of all success.
Having thus worshipped the Mala, and also made Tarpana to it thrice with wine taken from the Shri-patra, accompanied by recitation of the Mula-Mantra, the worshipper should, with well-controlled mind, make japa one thousand and eight, or at least one hundred and eight times (171-173). Then, doing Pranayama, he should offer on the left lotus-hand of the Devi the fruit of his japa, whose form is Tejas, together with water and flowers from the Shri-patra, and, bowing down his head to the ground, say the following:
Mantra
O Great Queen! Thou Who protectest that which is most secret, deign to accept this my recitation. May by Thy grace success attend my effort.
After this, let him with folded hands recite the hymn and the protective Mantra (174-176). Then the Sadhaka should, with the special oblation in his hand, going round the Devi, keeping Her to his right, say the following, and dedicate his own self by offering Vilomarghya (177).
Mantra
Om, whatsoever ere this I in the possession of life, intelligence, body, or in action, awake, in dream or dreamless sleep have done, whether by word or deed, by my hands, feet, belly, or organ of generation, whatsoever I have remembered or spoken – of all that I make an offering to Brahman. I and all that is mine I lay at the lotus-feet of the Adya Kali. I make the sacrifice of myself Ong tat sat (178-179).
Then, with folded hands, let him supplicate his Ishta-Devata, and reciting the Maya-Mantra, say:
Mantra
“O Primordial Kalika! I have worshipped Thee with all my powers and devotion,”
and then saying, “Forgive me,” let him bid the Devi go. Let him with his hands formed into Sanghara-Mudra take up a flower, smell it, and place it on his heart (182-183). A triangular figure well and clearly made should next be drawn in the North-East corner, and there he should worship the Devi Nirmalya-vasini with the
Mantra
Hring salutation to the Devi Nirmalya-vasini (184).
Then, distributing Naivedya to Brahma, Vishnu, and Shiva, and all the other Devas, the worshipper should partake of it (185). Then, placing his Shakti on a separate seat to his left, or on the same seat with himself, he should make a pleasing drink in the cup (186), The cup should be so formed as to hold not more than five and not less than three tolas of wine, and may be of either gold or silver (187), or crystal, or made of the shell of a cocoa-nut. It should be kept on a support on the right side of the plate containing the prepared food (188).
Then the wise one should serve the sacred food and wine either himself or by his brother’s sons among the worshippers according to the order of their seniority (189). The purified wine should be served in the drinking-cups, and the purified food in plates kept for that purpose, and then should food and drink be taken with such as are present at the time (190). First of all, some purified food should be eaten to make a bed as it were (for the wine which is to be drunk). Let the assembled worshippers then joyously take up each his own cup filled with excellent nectar.
Then let him take up each his own cup and meditate upon the Kula-Kundalini, who is the Chit, and who is spread from the Muladhara lotus to the tip of the tongue, and, uttering the Mula-Mantra, let each, after taking the others’ permission, offer it as oblation to the mouth of the Kundali (191-193). When the Shakti is of the household, the smelling of the wine is the equivalent of drinking it. Worshippers who are householders may drink five cups only (194). Excessive drinking prevents the attainment of success by Kula worshippers (195).
They may drink until the sight or the mind is not affected. To drink beyond that is bestial (196). How is it possible for a sinner who becomes a fool through drink and who shows contempt for the Sadhaka of Shakti to say “I worship the Adya Kalika”? (197). As touch cannot affect food, etc, offered to Brahman, so there is no distinction of caste in food offered to Thee (198).



Mahanirvana Tantra

Next, form with the left hand the Naivedya-Mudra, which is like a full-blown lotus. Then, whilst reciting the Mula-Mantra, give away the jar with wine to the Devi for Her to drink. After that offer again water for rinsing the mouth, and following that a threefold oblation should be made to the Devi with wine from the cup of the Shri-patra (93-94). Then, reciting the Mula-Mantra, let the worshipper offer five handfuls of flowers to the head, heart, Muladhara Lotus, the feet, and all parts of the body of the Devi (95), and thereafter with folded palms he should pray to his Ishta-devata thus:
Mantra
O Ishta-devata! I am now worshipping the Devatas who surround thee, namah (96).
The six parts of the body of the Devi should then be worshipped at the four corners of the Yantra, and in front and behind it in their order; and then the line of Gurus should be worshipped (97). Then, with scent and flowers, worship the four Kula-gurus – namely, Guru, Parama-guru, Parapara-guru, Parameshti-guru (98).
Then, with the wine in the cup of the Guru, make three Tarpanas to each, and on the lotus of eight petals worship the eight Mother Nayikas – namely, Mangala, Vijaya, Bhadra, Jayanti, Aparajita, Nandini, Narasinghi, and Kaumari (99-100), and on the tips of the petals worship the eight Bhairavas – Asitanga, Ruru, Chanda, Krodhonmatta, Bhayangkara, Kapali, Bhishana, and Sanghara (101-102). Indra and the other Dik-palas should be worshipped in the Bhu-pura, and their weapons outside the Bhu-pura, and then Tarpana should be made to them (103).
After worshipping (the Devi) with all the offerings, sacrifice should be carefully made to Her (104). The ten approved beasts which may be sacrificed are – deer, goat, sheep, buffalo, hog, porcupine, hare, iguana, and rhinoceros (105); but other beasts may also be sacrificed if the worshipper so desires (106). The worshipper versed in the rules of sacrifice should select a beast with good signs, and, placing it before the Devi, should sprinkle it with the water from the Vishesharghya, and by the Dhenu-Mudra should make it into nectar.
Let him then worship the goat (sheep, or whatever other animal is being sacrificed) with (the Mantra) “Namah to the goat,” which is a beast, and with perfumes, flowers, vermilion, food, and water. Then he should whisper into the ears of the beast the Gayatri Mantra, which severs the bond of its life as a beast (107-108). The Pashu-Gayatri, which liberates a beast from its life of a beast, is as follows: After the word “Pashu-pashaya” say ” Vidmahe,” then, after the word “Vishva-karmane,” say “Dhimahi,” and then “Tanno jivah prachodayat.”
Mantra
Let us bring to mind the bonds of the life of a beast. Let us meditate upon the Creator of the Universe. May He liberate us from out of this life (of a beast) (109-110).
Then, taking the sacrificial knife, the excellent worshipper should worship it with the Vija “Hung,” and worship Sarasvati and Brahma at its end, Lakshmi and Narayana at its middle, and Uma and Maheshvara at the handle (111-112). Then the sacrificial knife should be worshipped with the
Mantra
Namah to the sacrificial knife infused with the presence of Brahma, Vishnu, Shiva, and their Shaktis (113).
Then, dedicating it with the Great Word, he should, with folded hands, say: “May this dedication to Thee be according to the ordained rites” (114).
Having thus offered the beast to the Devi, it should be placed on the ground (115). The worshipper then, with mind intent upon the Devi, should sever the head of the beast with one sharp stroke. This may be done either by the worshipper himself or by his brother, brother’s son, a friend, or a kinsman, but never by one who is an enemy (116). The blood, when yet warm, should be offered to the Vatukas. Then the head with a light on it should be offered to the Devi with the following:
Mantra
“This head with the light upon it I offer to the Devi with obeisance ” (117).
This is the sacrificial rite of the Kaulikas in Kaula worship. If it be not observed, the Devata is never pleased (118). After this Homa should be performed. Listen, O Beloved One! to the rules which relate to it (119). The worshipper should, with sand, make on his right a square, each side of which is one cubit. Let him, then, while reciting the Mula-Mantra, gaze at it, stroke it with a wisp of kusha grass, uttering the Weapon-Vija, and then sprinkle it with water to the accompaniment of the same Vija (120).
Then, veiling it with the Kurchcha-Vija, he should say: “Obeisance to the sthandila of the Devi,” and with this Mantra worship the square (121). Then, inside the square three lines should be drawn from East to West, and three lines from South to North, of the length of a pradesha. When this has been done, the (following Devatas, whose names are hereinafter given) should be worshipped over these lines (122). Over the lines from West to East worship Mukunda, Isha, and Purandara: over the lines from South to North, Brahma, Vaivasvata, and Indu (123).
Then a triangle should be drawn within the square, and within the triangle the Vija Hsauh should be written. Outside the triangle draw a hexagon, outside this a cirde, and outside the circle a lotus with eight petals, and outside this a (square) Bhu-pura, with four entrances; so should the wise one draw the excellent Yantra (124). Having worshipped with the Mula-Mantra and with offerings of handfuls of flowers, the space thus marked off and washed, the articles for the Homa sacrifice with the Pranava, the intelligent one, should, after first uttering the Maya Vija, worship in the pericarp of the lotus the Adhara-shakti and others, either individually or collectively (125). Piety, Knowledge, Dispassion, and Dominion should be worshipped in the Agni, Ishana, Vayu, and Nairrita corners of the Yantra respectively, and the negation of the qualities in the East, North, West, and South respectively, and in the centre Ananta and Padma (126-127). Then let him worship Sun with his twelve parts, and Moon with her sixteen digits, and, on the filament commencing from the East, worship Pita, and then Shveta, Aruna, Krishna, Dhumra, Tibra, Sphulingini, Ruchira, in their order, and in the centre Jvalini (128-129). In all worship Pranava should commence the Mantra, and Namah should end it. The seat of Fire should be worshipped with the
Mantra
Rang, Salutation to the seat of Fire.
Then the Mantrin should meditate upon the Devi Sarasvati after She has bathed, with eyes like the blue lotus on the seat of Fire in the embrace of Vagishvara, and worship in the seat of Fire with the Maya-Vija (130).
Then let him bring Fire in the manner prescribed, and gaze intently on it, and, whilst repeating the Mula-Mantra, invoke Vahni into it with the Mantra Phat (131-132). Then the seat of Fire should be worshipped in the Yantra with the
Mantra
Ong Salutation to the Yoga-pitha of Fire,
and on the four sides, beginning on the East and ending on the South, Vama, Jyeshtha, Raudri, Ambika, should be worshipped in the order given (133).
Then the marked-off space should be worshipped with the
Mantra
Salutation to the sthandila of the revered Devata, the Primeval Kalika:
and then within this place the worshipper should meditate upon the Devi Vagishvari under the form of the Mula-Devata. After lighting the Fire with the Vija Rang, and reciting the Mula-Mantra, and then the
Mantra
Hung Phat: to the eaters of raw flesh: Svaha,
the share of the raw meat eaters (Rakshasas) should be put aside. Gaze at the Fire, saying the Weapon-Mantra, and surround it with the Veil Mudra, uttering the Vija Hung (134-136). Make the Fire into nectar with the Dhenu-Mudra. Take some Fire in both palms, and wave it thrice in a circle over the sthandila from right to left. Then with both knees on the ground, and meditating on Fire as the male seed of Shiva, the worshipper should place it into that portion of the Yoni Yantra which is nearest him (137-138). Then, first, worship the Image of Fire with the
Mantra
Hring, Salutation to the Image of Fire,
and after that the Spirit of Fire with the
Mantra
Rang: to the Spirit of Fire namah (139).
The Mantrin will then think in his mind of the awakened form of Vahni, and kindle the fire with the following (140)
Mantra
Ong, yellow Spirit of Fire, which knows all, destroy, destroy, burn, burn, ripen, ripen command: Svaha.
This is the Mantra for kindling Fire. After this, with folded hands, Fire should again be adored (141-142).
Mantra
I adore the kindled Fire of the colour of gold, free from impurity, burning, author of the Veda the devourer of oblations, which faces every quarter (143).
After adoration of Fire in this manner, cover the marked-off space with kusha grass, and then the worshipper, giving Fire the name of his own, Ishta-devata, should worship him (144).
Mantra
Ong,O Red-eyed One! Vaishvanara, origin of the Veda, come here, come, come here, (help me to) accomplish all (my) works: Svaha.
Then the seven Tongues of Fire, Hiranya and others, should be worshipped (145-146). The worshipper should next adore the six Limbs of Vahni uttering the word “of a thousand rays” in the dative singular, and at the end “obeisance to the heart” (147).
Then the wise one should worship the forms of Vahni (147), the eight forms Jata-veda and others (148), and then the eight Shaktis – namely, Brahmi and others, the eight Nidhis – namely, Padma and others, and the ten Dik-palas – namely, Indra and others (149).
After worshipping the thunderbolt and other weapons, the sacrificer should take two blades of kusha grass of the length of the space between his stretched-out thumb and forefinger, and place them lengthwise in the ghee (150). He should meditate on the Nadi Ida in the left part of the ghee, and on the Nadi Pingala in the right portion, and on the Nadi Sushumna in the centre, and with a well-controlled mind take ghee from the right side, and offer it to the right eye of Vahni with the following:
Mantra
Ong to Agni Svaha.
Then, taking ghee from the left side, offer it to the left eye of Vahni with the
Mantra
Ong to Soma Svaha (151-153).
Then, taking ghee from the middle portion, offer it to the forehead of Vahni with the
Mantra
Ong to Agni and Soma Svaha (154).
Then, saying namah, take the ghee again from the right side, say first the Pranava, and then
Mantra
To Agni the Svishti-krit Svaha.
With this Mantra he should offer oblation to the mouth of Vahni. Then, uttering the Vyahriti with the Pranava at the commencement, and Svaha at the end, the Homa sacrifice should be performed (155-156). Then he should offer oblations thrice with the
Mantra
Om,O Vaishvanara, origin of the Veda, come hither, come hither, O Red-eyed One! and fulfil all my works (157)
Then, invoking the Ishta-Devata with the proper Mantra into the Fire, let him worship Her and the Pitha-Devata. Twenty-five oblations should then be offered (uttering the Mula-Mantra with Svaha at the end), and, contemplating on the union (or identity) of his own soul with Vahni and the Devi, eleven oblations should also be offered with the Mula-Mantra to the Anga-Devatas, concluding with Svaha (158-159).
Then, with a mixture of ghee, tila-seed, honey, or with flowers and bael-leaves, or with (other prescribed) articles, oblation should be made for the attainment of one’s desire. This oblation should be made not less than eight times, and with every attention and care (160-161). Then, reciting the primary Mantra ending with Svaha, complete oblation should be made (with a full ladle) with fruits and leaves. The worshipper, with the Sanghara-Mudra, transferring the Devi from the Fire to the lotus of his heart (162), should then say “Pardon me,” and dismiss Him who feeds on oblations. Then, distributing presents, the Mantrin should consider that the Homa has been duly performed (163).
Then the excellent worshipper should place between the eyebrows what is left over of the oblations (164). This is the ordinance relating to Homa in all forms of Agama worship. After performance of Homa the worshipper should proceed to do japa (165). Now, listen,O Devi! to the instructions which relate to japa by which the Vidya is pleased. During japa, the Devata, the Guru, and the Mantra should be considered as one (166). The letters of the Mantra are the Devata, and the Devata is in the form of the Guru. To him who worships them as one and the same, his is the greatest success (167).
The worshipper should then meditate upon his Guru as being in his head, the Devi in his heart, the Mula-Mantra in the form of tejas on his tongue, and himself as united with the glory of all three (168). Then, adding the Tara to the beginning and the end of the Mula-Mantra, it should be made japa of seven times, and then it should be recapitulated with the Matrika Vija at its beginning and end (169). The wise worshipper should make japa of the Maya-Vija over his head ten times, and of the Pranava ten times over his mouth, and of the Maya-Vija again seven times in the lotus of his heart, and then perform Pranayama (170).
Then, taking a rosary of coral, etc, let him worship it thus:
Mantra
O rosary,O rosary,O great rosary, thou art the image of all Shaktis. Thou art the repository of the fourfold blessings. Do thou therefore be the giver to me of all success.
Having thus worshipped the Mala, and also made Tarpana to it thrice with wine taken from the Shri-patra, accompanied by recitation of the Mula-Mantra, the worshipper should, with well-controlled mind, make japa one thousand and eight, or at least one hundred and eight times (171-173). Then, doing Pranayama, he should offer on the left lotus-hand of the Devi the fruit of his japa, whose form is Tejas, together with water and flowers from the Shri-patra, and, bowing down his head to the ground, say the following:
Mantra
O Great Queen! Thou Who protectest that which is most secret, deign to accept this my recitation. May by Thy grace success attend my effort.
After this, let him with folded hands recite the hymn and the protective Mantra (174-176). Then the Sadhaka should, with the special oblation in his hand, going round the Devi, keeping Her to his right, say the following, and dedicate his own self by offering Vilomarghya (177).
Mantra
Om, whatsoever ere this I in the possession of life, intelligence, body, or in action, awake, in dream or dreamless sleep have done, whether by word or deed, by my hands, feet, belly, or organ of generation, whatsoever I have remembered or spoken – of all that I make an offering to Brahman. I and all that is mine I lay at the lotus-feet of the Adya Kali. I make the sacrifice of myself Ong tat sat (178-179).
Then, with folded hands, let him supplicate his Ishta-Devata, and reciting the Maya-Mantra, say:
Mantra
“O Primordial Kalika! I have worshipped Thee with all my powers and devotion,”
and then saying, “Forgive me,” let him bid the Devi go. Let him with his hands formed into Sanghara-Mudra take up a flower, smell it, and place it on his heart (182-183). A triangular figure well and clearly made should next be drawn in the North-East corner, and there he should worship the Devi Nirmalya-vasini with the
Mantra
Hring salutation to the Devi Nirmalya-vasini (184).
Then, distributing Naivedya to Brahma, Vishnu, and Shiva, and all the other Devas, the worshipper should partake of it (185). Then, placing his Shakti on a separate seat to his left, or on the same seat with himself, he should make a pleasing drink in the cup (186), The cup should be so formed as to hold not more than five and not less than three tolas of wine, and may be of either gold or silver (187), or crystal, or made of the shell of a cocoa-nut. It should be kept on a support on the right side of the plate containing the prepared food (188).
Then the wise one should serve the sacred food and wine either himself or by his brother’s sons among the worshippers according to the order of their seniority (189). The purified wine should be served in the drinking-cups, and the purified food in plates kept for that purpose, and then should food and drink be taken with such as are present at the time (190). First of all, some purified food should be eaten to make a bed as it were (for the wine which is to be drunk). Let the assembled worshippers then joyously take up each his own cup filled with excellent nectar.
Then let him take up each his own cup and meditate upon the Kula-Kundalini, who is the Chit, and who is spread from the Muladhara lotus to the tip of the tongue, and, uttering the Mula-Mantra, let each, after taking the others’ permission, offer it as oblation to the mouth of the Kundali (191-193). When the Shakti is of the household, the smelling of the wine is the equivalent of drinking it. Worshippers who are householders may drink five cups only (194). Excessive drinking prevents the attainment of success by Kula worshippers (195).
They may drink until the sight or the mind is not affected. To drink beyond that is bestial (196). How is it possible for a sinner who becomes a fool through drink and who shows contempt for the Sadhaka of Shakti to say “I worship the Adya Kalika”? (197). As touch cannot affect food, etc, offered to Brahman, so there is no distinction of caste in food offered to Thee (198).
As I have directed, so should eating and drinking be done. After partaking of food offeredto Thee, the hands should not be washed, but with a piece of cloth or a little water remove that which has adhered to the hands (199). Lastly, after placing a flower from the nirmalya on his head, and wearing a tilaka mark made from the remnants of the oblation on the Yantra between his eyebrows, the intelligent worshipper may roam the earth like a Deva (200).
End of the Sixth Joyful Message, entitled “Placing of the Shri-patra, Homa, Formation of the Chakra, and other Rites.”


Chapter 7 – Hymn of Praise (Stotra), Amulet (Kavacha), and the description of the Kula-tattva
PARVATI was pleased at hearing the revelation of the auspicious Mantra of the Adya Kalika, which yields abundant blessings, is the only means of attaining to a knowledge of the Divine essence, and leads to liberation; as also at hearing of the morning rites, the rules relating to bathing, Sandhya, the purification of Bhang, the methods of external and internal Nyasa and worship, the sacrifice of animals, Homa, the formation of the circle of worship, and the partaking of the holy food. Bowing low with modesty, the Devi questioned Shankara (1-3).
Shri Devi said:
O Sadashiva! Lord, and Benefactor of the Universe, Thou hast in Thy mercy spoken of the mode of worship of the supreme Prakriti (4), which benefits all being, is the sole path both for enjoyment and final liberation, and which gives, in this Age, in particular, immediate success (5). My mind, immersed in the ocean of the nectar of Thy word, has no desire to rise therefrom, but craves for more and more (6). O Deva, in the directions Thou hast given relating to the worship of the great Devi, Thou hast but given a glimpse of the hymn of praise, and of the protective Mantra. Do Thou reveal them now (7).
Shri Sadashiva said:
Listen, then, O Devi, Who art the adored of the worlds,to this unsurpassed hymn, by the reciting of or listening to which one becomes the Lord of all the Siddhis (8), (a hymn) which allays evil fortune, increases happiness and prosperity, destroys untimely death, and removes all calamities (9), and is the cause of the happy approach to the gracious Adya Kalika. It is by the grace of this hymn,O Happy One, that I am Tripurari (10).
O Devi! the Rishi of this hymn is Sadashiva, its metre is Anushtup, its Devata is the Adya Kalika, and the object of its use is the attainment of Dharmma, Artha, Kama, and Moksha (11).
Hymn Entitled Adya-Kali-Svarupa.
Hring, O Destroyer of Time,
Shring, O Terrific One,
Kring, Thou Who art beneficent,
Possessor of all the Arts,
Thou art Kamala,
Destroyer of the pride of the Kali Age,
Who art kind to Him of the matted hair, (12)
Devourer of Him Who devours,
Mother of Time,
Thou Who art brilliant as the Fires of the final Dissolution,
Wife of Him of the matted hair,
O Thou of formidable countenance,
Ocean of the nectar of compassion, (13)
Merciful,
Vessel of Mercy,
Whose Mercy is without limit,
Who art attainable alone by Thy mercy,
Who art Fire,
Tawny,
Black of hue,
Thou Who increasest the joy of the Lord of Creation, (14)
Night of Darkness,
Image of Desire,
Yet Liberator from the bonds of desire,
Thou Who art (dark) as a bank of Clouds,
And bearest the crescent-moon,
Destructress of sin in the Kali Age, (15)
Thou Who art pleased by the worship of virgins,
Thou Who art the Refuge of the worshippers of virgins,
Who art pleased by the feasting of the virgins,
Who art the Image of the virgin, (16)
Thou Who wanderest in the kadamba forest,
Who art pleased with the flowers of the kadamba forest,
Who hast Thy abode in the kadamba forest,
Who wearest a garland of kadamba flowers, (17)
Thou Who art youthful,
Who hast a soft low voice,
Whose voice is sweet as the cry of a Chakravaka bird,
Who drinkest and art pleased with the kadambari wine, (18)
And Whose cup is a skull,
Who wearest a garland of bones,
Who art pleased with,
And Who art seated on the Lotus, (19)
Who abidest in the centre of the Lotus,
Whom the fragrance of the Lotus pleases,
Who movest with the swaying gait of a Hangsa,
Destroyer of fear,
Who assumest all forms at will,
Whose abode is at Kama-rupa, (20)
Who ever plays at the Kama-pitha,
O beautiful One,
O Creeper Which givest every desire,
Who art the Possessor of beautiful ornaments, (21)
Adorable as the Image of all tenderness,
Thou with a tender body,
And Who art slender of waist,
Who art pleased with the nectar of purified wine,
Giver of success to them whom purified wine rejoices, (22)
The own Deity of those who worship Thee when joyed with wine,
Who art gladdened by the worship of Thyself with purified wine,
Who art immersed in the ocean of purified wine,
Who art the Protectress of those who accomplish vrata with wine, (23)
Whom the fragrance of musk gladdens,
And Who art luminous with a tilaka-mark of musk,
Who art attached to those who worship Thee with musk,
Who lovest those who worship Thee with musk, (24)
Who art a Mother to those who burn musk as incense,
Who art fond of the musk-deer and art pleased to eat its musk,
Whom the scent of camphor gladdens,
Who art adorned with garlands of camphor,
And Whose body is smeared with camphor and sandal paste, (25)
Who art pleased with purified wine flavoured with Camphor,
Who drinkest purified wine flavoured with camphor,
Who art bathed in the ocean of camphor,
Whose abode is in the ocean of camphor, (26)
Who art pleased when worshipped with the Vija Hung,
Thou Who threatenest with the Vija Hung,
Embodiment of Kulachara,
Adored by Kaulikas,
Benefactress of the Kaulikas, (27)
Observant of Kulachara,
Joyous One, Revealer of the path of the Kaulikas,
Queen of Kashi,
Allayer of sufferings,
Giver of blessings to the Lord of Kashi,(28)
Giver of pleasure to the Lord of Kashi,
Beloved of the Lord of Kashi, (29)
Thou Whose toe-ring bells make sweet melody as Thou movest,
Whose girdle bells sweetly tinkle,
Who abidest in the mountain of gold,
Who art like a Moon-beam on the mountain of gold, (30)
Who art gladdened by the recitation of the Mantra Kling,
Who art the Kama Vija,
Destructress of all evil inclinations,
And of the afflictions of the Kaulikas,
Lady of the Kaulas, (31)
O Thou Who by the three Vijas, Kring, Hring, Shring, art the Destructress of the fear of Death.
(To Thee I make obeisance.)
These are proclaimed as the Hundred Names of Kalika (32), beginning with the letter Ka. They are all identical with the image of Kali (33). He who in worship recites these names with his mind fixed on Kalika, for him Mantra-siddhi is quickly obtained, and with him Kali is pleased (34). By the mere bidding of his Guru he acquires intelligence, knowledge, and becomes wealthy, famous, munificent, and compassionate (35). Such an one enjoys life happily in this world with his children and grandchildren with wealth and dominion (36). He who, on a new moon night, when it falls on Tuesday, worships the great Adya Kali, Mistress of the three worlds, with the five Ma-karas, and repeats Her hundred names, becomes suffused with the presence of the Devi, and for him there remains nothing in the three worlds which is beyond his powers (37-38).
He becomes in learning like Brihaspati himself, in wealth like Kuvera. His profundity is that of the ocean, and his strength that of the wind (39). He shines with the blinding brilliance of the Sun, yet pleases with the soft glamour of the Moon. In beauty he becomes like the God of Love, and reaches the hearts of women (40). He comes forth as conqueror everywhere by the grace of this hymn of praise. Singing this hymn, he attains all his desires (41). All these desires he shall attain by the grace of the gracious Adya, whether in battle, in seeking the favour of Kings, in wagers, or in disputes, and when his life be in danger (42), at the hands of robbers, amidst burning villages, lions, or tigers (43), in forests and lonely deserts, when imprisoned, threatened by Kings or adverse planets, in burning fever, in long sickness, when attacked by fearful disease (44), in the sickness of children caused by the influence of adverse planets, or when tormented by evil dreams, when fallen in boundless waters, and when he be in some storm-tossed ship (45).
O Devi! he who with firm devotion meditates upon the Parama Maya–image of the most excellent Kali–is without a doubt relieved of all dangers. For him there is never any fear, whether arising from sin or disease (46-47). For him there is ever victory, and defeat never. At the mere sight of him all dangers flee (48). He expounds all Scriptures, enjoys all good fortune, and becomes the leader in all matters of caste and duty,and the lord among his kinsmen (49). In his mouth Vani ever abides, and in his home Kamala. Men bow with respect at the mere mention of his name (50). The eight Siddhis, such as Anima and others, he looks upon as but mere bits of grass.
I have now recited the hymn of a hundred names, which is called “The Very Form of the Adya Kali” (51).
Purashcharana of this hymn, which is its repetition one hundred and eight times, yields all desired fruit (52). This hymn of praise of a hundred names, which is the Primeval Kali Herself, if read, or caused to be read, if heard, or caused to be heard, frees from all sins and leads to union with Brahman (53-54).
Shri Sadashiva said.
I have spoken of the great hymn of the Prakriti of the Supreme Brahman, hear now the protective Mantra of the sacred Adya Kalika (55). The name of the Mantra is “Conqueror of the three Worlds,” its Rishi is Shiva, the verse is Anushtup, and its Devata the Adya Kali (56).
Its Vija is the Maya Vija, its Shakti is Kama Vija, and its Kilaka is Kring. It should be used for the attainment of all desired objects (57).
The Protective Mantra
(Known As Trailokya-Vijaya)
Hring, may the Adya protect my head;
Shring, may Kali protect my face;
Kring, may the Supreme Shakti protect my heart;
May She Who is the Supreme of the Supreme protect my throat (58);
May Jagaddhatri protect my two eyes;
May Shankari protect my two ears;
May Mahamaya protect my power of smell;
May Sarvva-mangala protect my taste (58);
May Kaumari protect my teeth;
May Kamalalaya protect my cheeks;
May Kshama protect my upper and lower lips;
May Charu-hasini protect my chin (60);
May Kuleshani protect my neck;
May Kripa-mayi protect the nape of my neck;
May Bahu-da protect my two arms;
May Kaivalya-dayini protect my two hands; (61)
May Kapardini protect my shoulders;
May Trailokya-tarini protect my back;
May Aparna protect my two sides;
May Kamathasana protect my hips (62);
May Vishalakshi protect my navel;
May Prabha-vati protect my organ of generation;
May Kalyani protect my thighs;
May Parvati protect my feet;
May Jaya-durga protect my vital breaths,
And Sarvva-siddhi-da protect all parts of my body (63).
As to those parts as have not been mentioned in the Kavacha, and are unprotected, may the Eternal Primeval Kali protect all such (64).
I have now spoken to Thee of the wonderful heavenly Protective Mantra of the Adya Devi Kalika, which is known as the “Conqueror of the three Worlds” (65).
He who repeats it at his devotions with his mind fixed upon the Adya obtains all his desires, and She becomes propitious unto him (66). He quickly attains Mantra-siddhi. The lesser siddhis become, as it were, his slaves (67). He who is childless gets a son, he who desires wealth gains riches. The seeker of learning attains it, and whatsoever a man desires he attains the same (68).
The Purashcharana of this Protective Mantra is its repetition a thousand times, and this gives the desired fruit (69). If it be written on birch-bark, with the paste of sandal, fragrant aloe, musk, saffron, or red sandal, and encased in a golden ball, worn either on the right arm, round the neck, in the crown lock, or round the waist, then the Adya Kali becomes devoted to its wearer, and grants him whatsoever he may desire (70-71). Nowhere has he fear. In all places he is a conqueror. He becomes ready of speech, free from ailments, long-lived and strong, endowed with all power of endurance (72), and an adept in all learning. He knows the meaning of all Scriptures, has Kings under his control, and holds both pleasure and emancipation in the hollow of his hand (73).
For men affected with the taint of the Kali Age it is a most excellent Mantra for the attainment of final liberation (74).
Shri Devi said:
Thou hast, O Lord! in Thy kindness told me of the Hymn and Protective Mantra; I now desire to hear of the rules relating to Purashcharana (75).
Shri Sadashiva said:
The rules relating to Purashcharana in the worship of the Adya Kalika are the same as those relating to the Purashcharana in the worship with the Brahma-Mantra (76). For Sadhakas who are unable to do them completely, both Japa, Puja and Homa, and Purashcharana may be curtailed (77), since it is better to observe these rites on a small scale than not to observe them at all. Now listen, O Gentle One! the while I describe to Thee the shortened form of worship (78). Let the wise one rinse his mouth with the Mula-Mantra, and then perform Rishi-nyasa. Let him purify the palms of the hands, and proceed to Kara-nyasa and Anga-nyasa (79). Passing the hands all over the body, let him practise Pranayama, and then meditate, worship, and inwardly recite. This is the ceremonial for the shortened form of worship (80).
In this form of worship, in lieu of Homa and other rites, the Mantras may be recited four times the number prescribed in the case of each of them respectively (81). There is also another mode of performance. A person who, when the fourteenth day of the dark half of the month falls on a Tuesday or Saturday, worships Jaganmayi with the five elements of worship, and recites with fully attentive mind the Mantra ten thousand times at midnight and feasts believers in the Brahman has performed Purashcharana (82-83). From one Tuesday to another Tuesday the Mantra should every day be inwardly recited a thousand times. The Mantra thus recited eight thousand times is equal to the performance of Purashcharana (84-85).
In all Ages, O Devi! but particularly in the Kali Age, the Mantras of the Sacred Primeval Kalika are of great efficacy, and yield complete success (85-86). O Parvati! In the Kali Age, Kali in her various forms is ever watchful, but when the Kali Age is in full sway, then the form of Kali Herself is for the benefit of the world (87). In initiation into this Kalika Mantra there is no necessity to determine whether it be siddha or su-siddha, or the like, or favourable or inimical. If japa is made of it, which is both niyama and a-niyama, the Adya Devi is pleased (88). The mortal, by the grace of the glorious Adya, attains a knowledge of the divine essence, and, possessed of such knowledge, is, without a doubt, liberated even while living (89). Beloved, there is no need here for over-exertion or endurance or penances. The religious exercises of the worshippers of the Adya Kali are pleasant to accomplish (90). By the mere purification of the heart the worshipper attains all that he desires (91). So long, however, as the heart is not purified, so long must the worshipper practise the rites with devotion to Kula. (92)
The carrying out of the practices ordained produces purification of the heart. The Mantra should, however, first be received from the mouth of the Guru in the case of the Brahma-Mantra (93). O Great Queen! Purashkriya should be done after the performance of the necessary worship and of other prescribed rites. In the purified heart knowledge of Brahman grows. And when knowledge of Brahman is attained, there is neither that which should, nor that which should not, be done (94).
Shri Parvati said:
O Great Deva! what is Kula, and what is Kulachara? O Great Lord! what is the sign of each of the five elements of worship? I desire to hear the truth relating to these (95).
Shri Sadashiva said:
Thou hast asked well, O Lady of the Kulas. Thou art indeed the Benefactress of the worshippers. Listen! For Thy pleasure I shall accurately describe to Thee these things (96). The Kula are Jiva, Prakriti, space, time, ether, earth, water, fire, and air (97). O Primeval One! the realization that all this is one with Brahman is Kulachara, and produces Dharmma, Artha, Kama, and Moksha (98). Those whose sins are washed away by merits acquired in various previous births by penances, alms, and faithful observance of worship, it is they whose minds are inclined in Kaulika worship (99). When the intelligence realizes the essence of Kaulika worship, it becomes at once purified, and the mind inclines to the lotus-feet of the Primeval Kali (100). The excellent worshipper versed in Kaula doctrine who has received this most excellent Vidya by the service of a good spiritual teacher, if he remains firmly attached to Kaulika worship and to the worship with the five elements of the Primeval Kalika, the Patron Devi of Kula, will enjoy a multitude of blessings in this life, and attain final liberation at its close. (102)
The characteristic of the first element is that it is the great medicine for humanity, helping it to forget deep sorrows, and is the cause of joy (103). But, O Dearest One! the element which is not purified stupefies and bewilders, breeds disputes and diseases, and should be rejected by the Kaulas (104). Beasts bred in villages, in the air, or forest, which are nourishing, and increase intelligence, energy, and strength, are the second element (105). O Beautiful One! of the animals bred in water, that which is pleasing and of good taste, and increases the generative power of man, is the third element (106). The characteristics of the fourth element are that it is easily obtainable, grown in the earth, and is the root of the life of the three worlds (107). And, O Devi, the signs of the fifth element are that it is the cause of intense pleasure to all living things, is the origin of all creatures, and the root of the world which is without either beginning or end (108). Know, Dearest One! that the first element is fire, the second is air, the third is water, the fourth is the earth (109), and, O Beauteous Face! as to the fifth element, know it to be ether, the support of the Universe (110). O Sovereign Mistress of Kula, he who knows Kula, the five Kula-tattvas, and Kula worship, is liberated whilst yet living (111).
End of the Seventh Joyful Message, entitled “Hymn of Praise (Stotra), Amulet (Kavacha), and the description of the Kula-tattva.”










1 (My humble salutations to Swamyjis , Philosophic Scholars, Knowledge seekers for the collection)

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